Portland Public Library

The sum of the people, how the census has shaped nations, from the ancient world to the modern age, Andrew Whitby

Label
The sum of the people, how the census has shaped nations, from the ancient world to the modern age, Andrew Whitby
Language
eng
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 275-335) and index
Illustrations
illustrationsmaps
Index
index present
Literary Form
non fiction
Main title
The sum of the people
Nature of contents
bibliography
Oclc number
1140116172
Responsibility statement
Andrew Whitby
Sub title
how the census has shaped nations, from the ancient world to the modern age
Summary
Provides a 3,000-year history of the census, chronicling the practices of the ancient world through the Supreme Court rulings of today, examining how censuses have been used as tools of democracy, exclusion and mass surveillanceIn 2020, the United States will embark again on what has been called "the largest peacetime mobilization in American history": the decennial population census. It is part of a tradition of counting people that goes back more than three millennia and now spans the globe. In The Sum of the People, data scientist Andrew Whitby traces the remarkable history of the census from ancient China and the Roman Empire through revolutionary America, Nazi-occupied Europe, and post-apartheid South Africa all the way to the steps of the Supreme Court. Conceived in antiquity to impose taxation and military conscription, the census was reinvented in the Enlightenment era to support representative government and delimit the boundaries of new nation states. As enumeration became a foundation of modern, technocratic governance in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, controversy raged about who was counted, who was not, and what questions they were asked. Censuses have been marvels of democracy, instruments of exclusion, and, at worst, tools of tyrrany and genocide. They have profoundly shaped the societies we've built. Today, in a world beset by high-tech surveillance, The Sum of the People shows how the traditional census--direct, transparent and accountable--is something worth celebrating--Publisher's description
resource.variantTitle
How the census has shaped nations, from the ancient world to the modern age
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