Coverart for item
The Resource The Americans : the democratic experience, Daniel J. Boorstin

The Americans : the democratic experience, Daniel J. Boorstin

Label
The Americans : the democratic experience
Title
The Americans
Title remainder
the democratic experience
Statement of responsibility
Daniel J. Boorstin
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Final volume in a trilogy; the first of which is the author's The Americans, the colonial experience; and the second of which is his The Americans, the national experience
  • Daniel J. Boorstin's long-awaited full-scale portrait of modern America chronicles the Great Transformation that has come about in our daily lives since the Civil War. [This book] recaptures the drama and the meaning of the countless and sometimes little-noticed revolutions which occurred, not in legislatures or on battlefields but in our homes and farms and factories and schools and stores--making something surprising and unprecedented of our everyday experience. The revolutions in our daily life have been the work of a peculiarly American galaxy of talent--from cow-town builder Joseph McCoy; Edwin L. Drake, the retired railroad conductor who was crazy enough to "drill" for oil; R. G. Dun, the self-made Ohio merchant who made a career of reporting the credit rating of other merchants (to build Dun & Bradstreet); the railway agent Richard Warren Sears, who started the greatest general merchandising operation in the world; Raymond Smith, who democratized gambling and helped build Reno; Robert Bonner, flamboyant publisher of sensational novels who forced newspapers to use display type for advertising--from these inventors and businessmen to the educators who sponsored a New Higher Learning and the linguists who brought the colloquial into the classroom, the psychologist who reinterpreted our sexual mores, and the scientists who escalated us into a New Momentum. While Dr. Boorstin takes a new look at everything from Christmas to air conditioning, from the rise of the candy bar to the decline of grammar, he does not relate facts simply because they are themselves interesting, amusing, and enlightening--though they are that, too. For he uses them all to help ask: What has life come to mean--and ceased to mean--to us late-twentieth-century Americans? He shows us how we became a nation held together by what we buy and the ads we read, defined by how we count ourselves and how others count us, characterized by the way we describe our wealth or our poverty. The new American technology of food and drink and construction, of education and communication and travel--including the "mass-produced moment" via photography and the phonograph--dilutes our daily life with "repeatable experience" in the very act of enriching it. The endless streams of property created by the American corporation, the new ambiguity of ownership in a nation of franchised outlets (for everything from car mufflers to hamburgers), and the new democracy of packaging, in which the wrapping of items often costs more than their contents, add up to the "thinner life of things." The quest for novelty--from the multibillion-dollar efforts of Research and Development producing solutions which then must go in search of problems to the annual (and semiannual) automobile models and the idealization of newness in art--has brought, along with its rewards, a new bewilderment over what we really mean by something new. The very idea of Progress is displaced by the Rate of Growth. All this adds up--in Dr. Boorstin's phrase--to the Democratic Experience. Few books about the U.S.A. since De Tocqueville have had the sweep, the scope, the originality, and the intimacy of [this one]. Reaching back to the roots of all this in the era of the Civil War, Dr. Boorstin makes his history into a kind of national autobiography, reminding us of how we have made ourselves what we are. While this book will long be a subject of controversy, it aims at a balanced assessment of the price and the promise of what American civilization has done with and for and to Americans.--Dust jacket
Awards note
Pulitzer Prize, History, 1974.
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1914-2004
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Boorstin, Daniel J.
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
E169.1.B7513
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Daniel J. Boorstin Collection (Library of Congress)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
  • États-Unis
  • États-Unis
  • Civilization
  • Economic history
  • United States
  • Bildung
  • Diplomatie
  • Kultur
  • USA
  • United States
  • United States
Label
The Americans : the democratic experience, Daniel J. Boorstin
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Final volume in a trilogy; the first of which is the author's The Americans: the colonial experience; and the second of which is his The Americans: the national experience
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 605-682)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Book One: Everywhere communities -- Part One: The go-getters -- "Gold from the grass roots up" -- Rituals of the open range -- Private wars for the public domain -- Lawless sheriffs and honest desperadoes -- Rounding up rock oil -- Generalized go-getters: lawyers -- Exploiting the federal commodity: divorce and gambling -- Crime as a service institution -- Part Two: Consumption communities -- A democracy of clothing -- Consumers' palaces -- Nationwide customers -- Goods sell themselves -- How farmers joined consumption communities -- Citifying the country -- A new freedom for advertisers: breaking the agate rule -- Building loyalty to consumption communities -- "The consumer is king" -- Christmas and other festivals of consumption -- Part Three: Statistical communities -- A numerical science of community: the rise of the average man -- communities of risk -- Statistical expectations: what's your sizw? -- Making things no better than they need to be -- "The incorruptible cashier" -- Income consciousness -- The rediscovery of poverty -- Measuring the mind -- From "Naughtiness" to "Behavior Deviation" -- Statistical morality -- Part Four: The urban quest for place -- An American diaspora -- Politics for city immigrants -- stretching the city: the decline of main street -- Booming the real estate frontier -- Antidotes for the city: utopia, renewal, suburbia -- Cities within cities: the urban blues -- Book Two: The decline of the miraculous -- Part Five: Leveling times and places -- Condense! making food portable through time -- Meat for the cities -- Varying the everyday menu -- People's palaces on wheels -- Walls become windows -- Homogenizing space -- Part Six: Mass-producing the momnent -- Time becomes fungible: packaging the unit of work -- Making experience repeatable -- Extending experience: the new segregation -- The decline of the unique and the secret -- In search of the spontaneous -- Book Three: A popular culture -- Part Seven: The thinner life of things -- Endless streams of ownership -- New penumbras of property -- The semi-independent businessman -- From packing to packaging: the new strategy of desire -- Part Eight: Language, knowledge, and the arts -- The decline of grammar: the colloquial conquers the classroom -- From oratory to public speaking: fireside politics -- A higher learning for all -- Educating "the Great Army of Incapables" -- Art becomes enigma -- The exotic becomes commonplace -- Book Four: The future on schedule -- Part Nine: Search for novelty -- The social inventor: inventing for the market -- Communities of inventors: solutions in search of problems -- Flow technology: the road to the annual model -- Part Ten: Mission and momentum -- Prologue to foreign aid -- Samartian diplomacy -- Not whether but when: the new momentum -- Epilogue: Unknown costs
Control code
591527
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
1st ed..
Extent
xiv, 717 pages
Isbn
9780394487243
Lccn
73003449
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)591527
Label
The Americans : the democratic experience, Daniel J. Boorstin
Publication
Note
Final volume in a trilogy; the first of which is the author's The Americans: the colonial experience; and the second of which is his The Americans: the national experience
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 605-682)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Book One: Everywhere communities -- Part One: The go-getters -- "Gold from the grass roots up" -- Rituals of the open range -- Private wars for the public domain -- Lawless sheriffs and honest desperadoes -- Rounding up rock oil -- Generalized go-getters: lawyers -- Exploiting the federal commodity: divorce and gambling -- Crime as a service institution -- Part Two: Consumption communities -- A democracy of clothing -- Consumers' palaces -- Nationwide customers -- Goods sell themselves -- How farmers joined consumption communities -- Citifying the country -- A new freedom for advertisers: breaking the agate rule -- Building loyalty to consumption communities -- "The consumer is king" -- Christmas and other festivals of consumption -- Part Three: Statistical communities -- A numerical science of community: the rise of the average man -- communities of risk -- Statistical expectations: what's your sizw? -- Making things no better than they need to be -- "The incorruptible cashier" -- Income consciousness -- The rediscovery of poverty -- Measuring the mind -- From "Naughtiness" to "Behavior Deviation" -- Statistical morality -- Part Four: The urban quest for place -- An American diaspora -- Politics for city immigrants -- stretching the city: the decline of main street -- Booming the real estate frontier -- Antidotes for the city: utopia, renewal, suburbia -- Cities within cities: the urban blues -- Book Two: The decline of the miraculous -- Part Five: Leveling times and places -- Condense! making food portable through time -- Meat for the cities -- Varying the everyday menu -- People's palaces on wheels -- Walls become windows -- Homogenizing space -- Part Six: Mass-producing the momnent -- Time becomes fungible: packaging the unit of work -- Making experience repeatable -- Extending experience: the new segregation -- The decline of the unique and the secret -- In search of the spontaneous -- Book Three: A popular culture -- Part Seven: The thinner life of things -- Endless streams of ownership -- New penumbras of property -- The semi-independent businessman -- From packing to packaging: the new strategy of desire -- Part Eight: Language, knowledge, and the arts -- The decline of grammar: the colloquial conquers the classroom -- From oratory to public speaking: fireside politics -- A higher learning for all -- Educating "the Great Army of Incapables" -- Art becomes enigma -- The exotic becomes commonplace -- Book Four: The future on schedule -- Part Nine: Search for novelty -- The social inventor: inventing for the market -- Communities of inventors: solutions in search of problems -- Flow technology: the road to the annual model -- Part Ten: Mission and momentum -- Prologue to foreign aid -- Samartian diplomacy -- Not whether but when: the new momentum -- Epilogue: Unknown costs
Control code
591527
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
1st ed..
Extent
xiv, 717 pages
Isbn
9780394487243
Lccn
73003449
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)591527

Library Locations

    • Portland Public LibraryBorrow it
      5 Monument Square, Portland, ME, 04101, US
      43.657680 -70.258550